Advertisement

Analysis of Learners’ Fieldtrip Talk during a Collaborative Inquiry Task

  • Canan Blake
  • Eileen Scanlon
  • Alison Twiner
  • Trevor Collins
  • Ann Jones
  • Lucinda Kerawalla
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8095)

Abstract

In this paper we analyse children’s talk with a view to understand how a technology enhanced inquiry learning toolkit played a part in enriching collaboration during a fieldtrip and facilitating social interaction. The participants in the study were 15 year-old students carrying out their geography GCSE (General Certificate in Secondary Education) work in a secondary school in the UK. During the fieldtrip, we provided students with nQuire, an inquiry learning toolkit to orchestrate their learning, on an ultra-mobile Asus Eee PC with a wireless connection to the coursework web site. Students collected data from twelve points in two towns with very different layout and land use. The learning environment created with the nQuire toolkit, ultra mobile PCs, personalised inquiry task and the use of scientific sensors to collect data offers possibilities for collaboration and effective interaction. In this study we analyse to what extent this environment supported learning collaboratively and to what extent students interacted with each other and with the technology to construct knowledge during the fieldtrip.

Keywords

collaborative learning CSCL inquiry learning nQuire 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Dillenbourg, P., Jarvala, S., Fischer, F.: The evolution of research on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning. From design to orchestration. In: Balacheff, N., et al. (eds.) Technology Enhanced Learning. Principles and Products, pp. 3–19. Springer (2009)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Overdijk, M., van Diggelen, W., Kirschner, P.A., Baker, M.: On the connection of agents and artifacts in CSCL: Toward a rationale of mutual shaping. International Journal of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning 7(2), 193–210 (2012)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Dillenbourg, P.: What do you mean by collaborative learning? In: Dillenbourg, P. (ed.) Collaborative-learning: Cognitive and Computational Approaches. Pergamon/Elsevier Science (1999)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Lipponen, L.: Exploring foundations for computer supported collaborative learning. In: Stahl, G. (ed.) Computer Support for Collaborative Learning: Foundations for a CSCL Community, pp. 72–81. Lawrence Erlbaum, Hillsdale (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Ash, D.: Using video data to capture discontinuous science meaning making in non-school settings. In: Ed Video Research in the Learning Sciences. Peter Lang Press (2007)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    The Final Report of Personal Inquiry (PI): Designing for Evidence-based Inquiry Learning across Formal and Informal Settings, http://www.pi-project.ac.uk/news/
  7. 7.
    Blake, C., Scanlon, E.: Analysing Collaborative Processes and Interaction Patterns in Online Discussions. In: Eighth International Conference on Networked Learning, April 02-04. Maastricht School of Management, Maastricht (2012)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Jones, A., Scanlon, E., Blake, C.: Conferencing in communities of learners: Examples from social history and science communication. Educational Technology and Society 3, 215–226 (2000)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Meier, A., Spada, H., Rummel, N.: A rating scheme for assessing the quality of computer-supported collaboration processes. International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning 2(1), 63–86 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Rummel, N., Deiglemayr, A., Spada, H., Kahrimanis, G., Avouris, N.: Analysing Collaborative Interactions Across Domains and Settings: An Adaptable Rating Scheme. In: Puntambekar, S., Erkens, G., Hmelo-Silver, C. (eds.) Analyzing Collaborative Interactions in CSCL: Methods, Approaches, and Issues. Springer, New York (2011)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Canan Blake
    • 1
  • Eileen Scanlon
    • 1
  • Alison Twiner
    • 1
  • Trevor Collins
    • 1
  • Ann Jones
    • 1
  • Lucinda Kerawalla
    • 1
  1. 1.The Open UniversityMilton KeynesUK

Personalised recommendations