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Introducing the Book

  • Mia Mahmudur Rahim
Chapter
Part of the CSR, Sustainability, Ethics & Governance book series (CSEG)

Abstract

CSR generally refers to social, economic, environmental and stakeholder responsibilities that companies should undertake in their activities. It is a strong component of new business and corporate governance (CG) models for long-term sustainability and for the development of socially responsible corporate culture. It has converged with the new trend of CG and contributed to the shifting of the traditional notion of CG to a vehicle for pursuing corporate management to consider broader public policy goals.

Keywords

Corporate Social Responsibility Social Responsibility Corporate Governance Fair Trade Legal Regulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mia Mahmudur Rahim
    • 1
  1. 1.School of AccountancyQueensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

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