Advertisement

Gesture Recognition Using Commodity RGB-D Sensor for Imitation Learning Platform for Children with Autism

  • Esubalew Bekele
  • Jake Bumpus
  • Shuvajit Das
  • Julie Crittendon
  • Zachary Warren
  • Nilanjan Sarkar
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 373)

Abstract

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is characterized by profound impairments in social interaction and communication. Children with ASD have deficits in core areas of social interactions such as gesture imitation. Gesture imitation is one of the early developed social communication skills and is thought to be linked with concurrent as well as later complex social skills such as language development, play and joint attention skills. Thus early identification of such a deficit and providing appropriate intervention regarding gestural imitation skills are quite important. This work, which is a part of a larger study that aims at building a gesture imitation intervention platform for children with ASD, leverages the intrinsic interest of the children with ASD in robotic technology. In this paper, we discuss the part of the robot-mediated intervention system that deals with gesture recognition and present preliminary recognition results.

Keywords

Gesture recognition hidden Markov models autism intervention adaptive interaction RGB-D sensor assistive robotics 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Quick reference to the diagnostic criteria from DSM-IV-TR, American Psychiatric Association, Amer. Psychiatric Pub. Incorporated, Washington, DC (2000)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ingersoll, B., Meyer, K.: Examination of correlates of different imitative functions in young children with autism spectrum disorders. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders 5(3), 1078–1085 (2011)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Stone, W.L., Yoder, P.J.: Predicting spoken language level in children with autism spectrum disorders. Autism 5(4), 341–361 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Stone, W.L., Ousley, O.Y., Littleford, C.D.: Motor imitation in young children with autism: what’s the object? Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 25(6), 475–485 (1997)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Rogers, S.J., Hepburn, S.L., Stackhouse, T., Wehner, E.: Imitation performance in toddlers with autism and those with other developmental disorders. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 44(5), 763–781 (2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Ingersoll, B., Lewis, E., Kroman, E.: Teaching the imitation and spontaneous use of descriptive gestures in young children with autism using a naturalistic behavioral intervention. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 37(8), 1446–1456 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Diehl, J.J., Schmitt, L.M., Villano, M., Crowell, C.R.: The clinical use of robots for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A critical review. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders 6(1), 249–262 (2011), doi:10.1016/j.rasd.2011.05.006CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Scassellati, B., Admoni, H., Matarić, M.: Humanoid Robots for Use in Autism Diagnosis/Research. Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering 14(1), 275–294 (2012)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Bekele, E., Lahiri, U., Swanson, A., Crittendon, J., Warren, Z., Sarkar, N.: A Step Towards Developing Adaptive Robot-Mediated Intervention Architecture (ARIA) for Children With Autism. IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering 21(2), 289–299 (2012)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Schaal, S.: Is imitation learning the route to humanoid robots? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3(6), 233–242 (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Calinon, S., D’halluin, F., Sauser, E.L., Caldwell, D.G., Billard, A.G.: Learning and reproduction of gestures by imitation. IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine 17(2), 44–54 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Duquette, A., Michaud, F., Mercier, H.: Exploring the use of a mobile robot as an imitation agent with children with low-functioning autism. Autonomous Robots 24(2), 147–157 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Fujimoto, I., Matsumoto, T., De Silva, P.R.S., Kobayashi, M., Higashi, M.: Mimicking and Evaluating Human Motion to Improve the Imitation Skill of Children with Autism Through a Robot. International Journal of Social Robotics, 1–9 (2011)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Rabiner, L.R.: A tutorial on hidden Markov models and selected applications in speech recognition. Proceedings of the IEEE 77(2), 257–286 (1989)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Esubalew Bekele
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jake Bumpus
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shuvajit Das
    • 1
    • 2
  • Julie Crittendon
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zachary Warren
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nilanjan Sarkar
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Vanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  2. 2.University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

Personalised recommendations