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Usability Evaluation of the Universal Computer Workstation under Supine, Sitting and Standing Postures

  • Hsin-Chieh Wu
  • Min-Chi Chiu
  • Cheng-Lung Lee
  • Ming-Yao Bai
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8016)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usability of the self-made universal computer workstation. The 9 handicapped and 10 healthy adults were recruited to participate in this study, in order to understand the performances of computer operation, ratings in comfort and satisfaction for using the tested workstation in different positions. This workstation can be successfully adjusted for standing, sitting, and supine postures. This workstation also allows easy access of wheelchair. No significant differences in performances were found among supine, sitting, and standing postures. All of the participants considered this workstation comfortable. Most handicapped participants preferred to adopt supine posture to use the computer. The experimental results revealed that supine posture lead to more comfort in the lower back without decreasing performances while using a computer. Further, the healthy participants had the mean rating in satisfaction of 3.7, which was similar to that of the handicapped. It indicates that the tested workstation satisfied both the handicapped and the healthy participants. The findings of this study can provide helpful information for further improvement of a universal computer workstation.

Keywords

universal design workstation usability ergonomic design 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hsin-Chieh Wu
    • 1
  • Min-Chi Chiu
    • 2
  • Cheng-Lung Lee
    • 1
  • Ming-Yao Bai
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Industrial Engineering and ManagementChaoyang University of TechnologyTaichungTaiwan, R.O.C.
  2. 2.School of Occupational TherapyChung Shan Medical UniversityTaichungTaiwan, R.O.C.

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