Advertisement

Changes in Posture of the Upper Extremity Through the Use of Various Sizes of Tablets and Characters

  • Hiroki Maniwa
  • Kentaro Kotani
  • Satoshi Suzuki
  • Takafumi Asao
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8016)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to analyze the posture of the upper extremities during the use of mobile communication devices. Using various sizes of mobile devices and display characters, we examined subjective muscular loads, viewing distances, and joint angles in the head, neck, shoulder, elbow, and lower back. No postural differences were found between the use of 7-in and 10-in devices, whereas the head and neck were significantly flexed and the elbow angles were decreased during the use of the 13-in device. Character size significantly affected the viewing distance; however, no differences in body angles were found. Participants continually increased their muscular loads during the task by flexing the head and neck, despite their high subjective discomfort levels in the neck and upper arm.

Keywords

tablet devices smartphone syndrome upper extremity posture angle analysis 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Judith, G., Driban, J., Thomas, N., Chakravarty, T., Channell, S., Komaroff, E.: Postures, typing strategies, and gender differences in mobile device usage: An observational study. Applied Ergonomics 43, 408–412 (2012)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Berolo, S., Wells, R.P., Amick, B.C.: Musculoskeletal symptoms among mobile hand-held device users and their relationship to device use: A preliminary study in a Canadian university population. Applied Ergonomics 42, 371–378 (2011)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Gustafsson, E., Johnson, P.W., Hagberg, M.: Thumb postures and physical loads during mobile phone use - A comparison of young adults with and without musculoskeletal symptoms. Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology 20, 127–135 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Lin, I.-M., Peper, E.: Psychophysiological patterns during cell phone text messaging: A Preliminary Study. Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback 34, 53–57 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kubota, S.: Effects of character size, character format, and pixel density on subjective legibility of reflective liquid crystal displays for personal digital assistants. The Institute of Image Information and Television Engineers 55(10), 1363–1366 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Sommerich, C., Starr, H., Smith, C., Shivers, C.: Effects of notebook, computer configuration and task on user biomechanics, productivity, and comfort. International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 30, 7–31 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Donald, N., Hirata, T., Hirata, S.: Kinesiology of the Musculoskeletal System Foundations for Physical Rehabilitation. Ishiyaku Shuppan Kabushikigaisha, 128–360 (2008) (in Japanese)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroki Maniwa
    • 1
  • Kentaro Kotani
    • 2
  • Satoshi Suzuki
    • 2
  • Takafumi Asao
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School of Science and EngineeringKansai UniversitySuitaJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of Engineering ScienceKansai UniversitySuitaJapan

Personalised recommendations