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E-Inclusion as the Next Challenge for Sustainable Consumption

  • Amon Rapp
  • Alessandro Marcengo
  • Marina Geymonat
  • Rossana Simeoni
  • Luca Console
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8009)

Abstract

In this paper we highlight how small producers of quality food, depositary of traditions that nowadays are running the risk of being lost, could be included in the benefits provided by digital technologies, through an interactive system that could enhance their old communication habits. Within PIEMONTE Project we adopted a co-design process to include these social actors in the design development. The result is an interactive system that, based on three technological pillars (a visual recognition algorithm, an ontology based knowledge manager, and a social network engine) and a vision of intelligent objects as a mean to promote the access and the interconnection in the world of quality food, tries to keep alive the cultural heritage of a territory.

Keywords

co-design sustainability gastronomy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amon Rapp
    • 1
  • Alessandro Marcengo
    • 2
  • Marina Geymonat
    • 2
  • Rossana Simeoni
    • 2
  • Luca Console
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentUniversity of TorinoTorinoItaly
  2. 2.Research & Prototyping DepartmentTelecom ItaliaTorinoItaly

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