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A Simulator for Designing Control Schemes for a Teleoperated Flexible Robotic System

  • Antonio De Donno
  • Florent Nageotte
  • Philippe Zanne
  • Laurent Goffin
  • Michel de Mathelin
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7815)

Abstract

No-scar surgery, which aims at performing surgical operations without visible scars, is the vanguard in the field of Minimally Invasive Surgery. No-scar surgery can be performed with flexible instruments, carried by a guide under the vision of an endoscopic camera. This technique brings many benefits for the patient, but also introduces several difficulties for the surgeon. We aim at developing a teleoperated robotic system for assisting surgeons in this kind of operations. In this paper we present this novel system, its kinematics and the strategies that we are proposing for its control. Also, we present a virtual simulator that we have specifically developed for our system with the purpose of assessing the control strategies and studying the possible system mechanical issues. Trials with novices show that the best control strategies depend on the kind of task to be performed and on the presence of simulated errors.

Keywords

Virtual simulation surgical robotics No-scar surgery telemanipulation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antonio De Donno
    • 1
  • Florent Nageotte
    • 1
  • Philippe Zanne
    • 1
  • Laurent Goffin
    • 1
  • Michel de Mathelin
    • 1
  1. 1.Equipe AVR, LSIIT UMR 7005University of Strasbourg and CNRSStrasbourg cedexFrance

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