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Chinese Emotion Lexicon Developing via Multi-lingual Lexical Resources Integration

  • Jun Xu
  • Ruifeng Xu
  • Yanzhen Zheng
  • Qin Lu
  • Kai-Fai Wong
  • Xiaolong Wang
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7817)

Abstract

This paper proposes an automatic approach to build Chinese emotion lexicon based on WordNet-Affect which is a widely-used English emotion lexicon resource developed on WordNet. The approach consists of three steps, namely translation, filtering and extension. Initially, all English words in WordNet-Affect synsets are translated into Chinese words. Thereafter, with the help of Chinese synonyms dictionary (Tongyici Cilin), we build a bilingual undirected graph for each emotion category and propose a graph based algorithm to filter all non-emotion words introduced by translation procedure. Finally, the Chinese emotion lexicons are obtained by expanding their synonym words representing the similar emotion. The results show that the generated-lexicons is a reliable source for analyzing the emotions in Chinese text.

Keywords

Emotion lexicon development Emotion analysis Multi-lingual 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jun Xu
    • 1
  • Ruifeng Xu
    • 1
  • Yanzhen Zheng
    • 1
  • Qin Lu
    • 2
  • Kai-Fai Wong
    • 3
    • 4
  • Xiaolong Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Network Oriented Intelligent Computation, Shenzhen Graduate SchoolHarbin Institute of TechnologyShenzhenChina
  2. 2.Department of ComputingThe Hong Kong Polytechnic UniversityHong Kong
  3. 3.Department of SEEMThe Chinese University of Hong KongHong Kong
  4. 4.Key Laboratory of High Confidence Software TechnologiesMinistry of EducationChina

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