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Social Stairs: Taking the Piano Staircase towards Long-Term Behavioral Change

  • Michel Peeters
  • Carl Megens
  • Elise van den Hoven
  • Caroline Hummels
  • Aarnout Brombacher
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7822)

Abstract

This paper addresses the development of Social Stairs, an intelligent musical staircase to change people’s behavior in the long-term to take the stairs in favor of the elevator. Through designing with the Experiential Design Landscape (EDL) method, a design opportunity was found that social engagement encouraged people to take the stairs at work in favor of the elevator. To encourage this social behavior, people who involved each other and worked together whilst using the Social Stairs were treated with more diverse orchestral chimes that echoed up the stairwell. In this paper we reflect on the differences between the persuasive system of the well-known Piano Staircase and the Social Stairs. We report on the deployment of the Social Stairs for a period of three weeks in the public space within the university community and identify opportunities for triggering intrinsic motivation, social engagement and how to keep people involved in the long-term.

Keywords

Intrinsic Motivation Social Engagement Musical Note Persuasive Technology Design Opportunity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michel Peeters
    • 1
  • Carl Megens
    • 1
  • Elise van den Hoven
    • 1
  • Caroline Hummels
    • 1
  • Aarnout Brombacher
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Industrial DesignEindhoven University of TechnologyEindhovenThe Netherlands

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