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Examining the Efficacy of a Persuasive Technology Package in Reducing Texting and Driving Behavior

  • Brenda Miranda
  • Chimwemwe Jere
  • Olayan Alharbi
  • Sri Lakshmi
  • Yasser Khouja
  • Samir Chatterjee
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7822)

Abstract

Over the past decade, texting and driving has become a prevalent form of distracted driving and resulted in an alarming rate of deaths and injuries. Research has documented the debilitating cognitive effects of engaging in texting and driving, comparing it to the dangers of driving drunk. Several states have implemented legislation banning texting and driving, however it remains a national epidemic. There is a paucity of empirical research examining the effectiveness of strategies in decreasing texting and driving behavior. Research employing technology as a potential solution has focused on using strategies such as hands-free technology or monitoring devices and applications. The current study takes on a different approach, by examining the efficacy of a persuasive technology package in motivating and facilitating behavior change. Findings provide preliminary evidence for the efficacy of pairing a video documentary and text message reminders in decreasing texting and driving behavior.

Keywords

Text Message Short Message Service Driving Behavior Persuasive Technology Fear Appeal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brenda Miranda
    • 1
  • Chimwemwe Jere
    • 2
  • Olayan Alharbi
    • 2
  • Sri Lakshmi
    • 2
  • Yasser Khouja
    • 2
  • Samir Chatterjee
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Behavioral and Organizational SciencesClaremont Graduate UniversityClaremontUSA
  2. 2.School of Information Systems and TechnologyClaremont Graduate UniversityClaremontUSA

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