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Professional Learning as a Moral Drive from Critical Discourse

Chapter
Part of the New Frontiers of Educational Research book series (NFER)

Abstract

This chapter builds on comparative studies based on my edited book (Kwo O (2010a) Teachers as learners: a moral commitment. In: Kwo O (ed) Teachers as learners: critical discourse on challenges and opportunities. Hong Kong: Comparative Education Research Centre, The University of Hong Kong and Dordrecht, Springer, pp 313–333) which summarizes some challenges and opportunities in the major thrusts of what, where and how teachers can learn. While considering questions about the values and purposes underlying the push for teacher learning, I have found it necessary to reach beyond institutional and sectoral boundaries to re-visit the fundamentals of education in a quest for the meaning of morality. This chapter presents a broadening vision of professional learning as a moral drive that can be cultivated from critical discourse over sustainability of human values.

Keywords

Teacher development Teachers’ sustainable learning 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationThe University of Hong KongPokfulamHong Kong

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