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A Pervasive Technology Approach to Social Trustworthiness

  • Wang Hongqi
  • Zongwei Luo
  • Tianle Zhang
  • Yuyu Yuan
  • Xu Wu
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 320)

Abstract

Growing awareness of environmental concerns has been reflected on more and more public’s attention on low carbon lifestyles. The awareness and public participation could be further enhanced and encouraged via computer assisted persuasive technologies to present carbon footprint information for products and services. Such technologies could shape public’s trust by establishing trustworthiness in carbon footprint information delivered, as carbon footprint itself is highly dynamic which could reflect potential differences between instances of the same product, for example. Trustworthy carbon footprint information would lead and help public to select and choose the product or services to buy. In this paper, we have adopted a persuasive technology approach to deliver and visualize dynamic carbon footprint information to encourage public to lead low carbon lifestyle. Mobile phones, Internet of Things networks, and other persuasive technologies are integrated in the prototype system developed to deliver and establish trustworthiness in the public.

Keywords

dynamic carbon footprint persuasive technology trust and trustworthiness 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wang Hongqi
    • 1
  • Zongwei Luo
    • 1
  • Tianle Zhang
    • 2
  • Yuyu Yuan
    • 2
  • Xu Wu
    • 2
  1. 1.E-Business Technology InstituteThe University of Hong KongHong KongChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Trustworthy Distributed Computing and Service (BUPT)Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and TelecommunicationsBeijingChina

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