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BOM Ontology-Based Composite Modeling Approach for Simulation Model

  • Jianchun Zhang
  • Fengju Kang
  • Huaxing Wu
  • Wei Huang
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 323)

Abstract

It is an efficient way for developing models by composition of reusable components. Successful composition of models means correct in both syntactic and semantic level. Base Object Model (BOM) facilitates and improves the semantic information of simulation model, and its purpose is to improve reusability and composition. However, there is no sufficient information for BOM matching in semantic level because that BOM has no rich and clear semantic information. In this paper BOM ontology is built to enhance BOM semantic information leaving the BOM unaltered by using ontology and an iterative approach is proposed to reduce the complexity of composition. The approach mainly consists of three phases: transformation from conceptual model to event classification model; model search; model matching and composition. Finally, we demonstrate this through a simple simulation system. The result shows that this approach is effective and can simplify the composition of ontologies.

Keywords

BOM ontology event classification model search match composition 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jianchun Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fengju Kang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Huaxing Wu
    • 1
    • 3
  • Wei Huang
    • 3
  1. 1.Marine College of Northwestern Polytechnical UniversityXi’anChina
  2. 2.National Key Laboratory of Underwater Information Process and ControlXi’anChina
  3. 3.Aeronautics & Astronautics Engineering CollegeAir Force Engineering UniversityXi’anChina

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