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Fostering Multidisciplinary Learning through Computer-Supported Collaboration Script: The Role of a Transactive Memory Script

  • Omid Noroozi
  • Armin Weinberger
  • Harm J. A. Biemans
  • Stephanie D. Teasley
  • Martin Mulder
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7563)

Abstract

For solving many of today’s complex problems, professionals need to collaborate in multidisciplinary teams. Facilitation of knowledge awareness and coordination among group members, that is through a Transactive Memory System (TMS), is vital in multidisciplinary collaborative settings. Online platforms such as ICT tools or Computer-supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) have the potential to facilitate multidisciplinary learning. This study investigates the extent to which establishment of various dimensions of TMS (specialization, coordination, credibility) is facilitated using a computer-supported collaboration script, i.e. a transactive memory script. In addition, we examine the effects of this script on individual learning satisfaction, experience, and performance. A pre-test, post-test design was used with 56 learners who were divided into pairs based on disciplinary background and randomly divided into treatment condition or control group. They were asked to analyse, discuss, and solve an authentic problem case related to their domains. Based on the findings, we conclude that a transactive memory script in the form of prompts facilitates construction of a TMS and also improves learners’ satisfaction with learning experience, and performance. We provide explanations and implications for these results.

Keywords

CSCL multidisciplinary transactivity transactive memory system transactive memory script 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Omid Noroozi
    • 1
  • Armin Weinberger
    • 2
  • Harm J. A. Biemans
    • 1
  • Stephanie D. Teasley
    • 3
  • Martin Mulder
    • 1
  1. 1.Wageningen UniversityNetherlands
  2. 2.Saarland UniversityGermany
  3. 3.University of MichiganUnited States

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