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i-PE: A Decentralized Approach for Designing Adaptive and Persuasive Intelligent Play Environments

  • Pepijn Rijnbout
  • Linda de Valk
  • Mark de Graaf
  • Tilde Bekker
  • Ben Schouten
  • Berry Eggen
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 277)

Abstract

This paper presents the approach of the intelligent Play Environments (i-PE) project. The aim of this project is to develop design guidelines for designing interactive environments that stimulate social and physical play. We want to create an environment that supports this play behavior and emphasizes on the flow of play by offering freedom in interaction. In this position paper, we describe our approach for designing such a play environment. We will introduce two focus areas for our research: playful persuasion and adaptation.

Keywords

Intelligent play environment decentralized systems open-ended play playful persuasion adaptation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pepijn Rijnbout
    • 1
  • Linda de Valk
    • 1
  • Mark de Graaf
    • 1
  • Tilde Bekker
    • 1
  • Ben Schouten
    • 1
  • Berry Eggen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Industrial DesignEindhoven University of TechnologyEindhovenThe Netherlands

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