Mathematical SETI pp 247-291

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Cubics of historical recovery

Chapter

Abstract

These words seem to summarize well a trend that often happened in history: an individual, or a civilization, rises from obscurity, reaches a peak, then falls to a minimum, but finally rises again and at such a high speed that even all previous achievements are dwarfed.

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References

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    C. Sagan, Cosmos, Random House, New York, 1980. See the unnumbered figure on p. 335, which inspired much of this chapter.Google Scholar
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    C. Maccone, “A mathematical ‘cubic law of recovery’, Part 1: Applications to history of astronomy, SETI and modern Europe,” Frontier Perspectives, 13(2), Fall/Winter 2004, 22–33.Google Scholar
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    C. Maccone, “Past and future of astronomy and SETI cast in maths,” paper dIAC.05.A4.2.11 presented at the 56th Interntional Astronautical (IAC) Congress, Fukuoka, Japan, October 16_21, 2005.Google Scholar
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    C. Maccone, “Past and future of astronomy and SETI cast in maths,” Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, 59 (2006), 283–289.ADSGoogle Scholar
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    C. Maccone, “SETI, extrasolar planets search and interstellar flight: When are they going to merge?” Acta Astronautica, 64, 2009, 724734.Google Scholar
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    M. Okuda and D. Okuda, Star Trek Chronology: The History of the Future, Pocket Books, New York, 1996.Google Scholar
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    A. Boss, Looking for Earths: The Race to Find New Solar Systems, Wiley, New York, 1998.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.International Academy of Astronautics and Istituto Nazionale di AstrofisicaTorino (Turin)Italy

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