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Improving Flexibility of Teaching and Learning with Blended Learning: A Case Study Analysis

  • Le Jun
  • Zhou Ling
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6837)

Abstract

Although blended learning has emerged in higher education for a few years and people generally think that it can bring effective learning and increase flexibility, it is not easy to introduce this instruction method to higher education. There are many major issues are relevant to designing blended learning systems. As we move into the future, it is important that we continue to identify successful models of blended learning at the institutional, program, course, and activity levels that can be adapted to work in varied contexts. In this paper, we show our experiences in a blended course. At first, we introduce our blended learning system and analyze the components. Secondly, we show our systematic instruction design method and strategies to support learning flexibility with open course structure, self-pace learning resource, learner-centered learning strategy, technology-mediated interaction, online learning community, technique tool support, and integrated assessment method in the course. In the end, we introduce a few data analysis results.

Keywords

blended learning learning flexibility instruction design interaction learning strategy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Le Jun
    • 1
  • Zhou Ling
    • 1
  1. 1.Information Network CenterGuangdong Radio & TV UniversityGuangzhouChina

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