Advertisement

‘STISIM-Drive’ Meets ‘MotorcycleSim’: Using Driving Simulation Software to Develop a Unique Motorcycle Simulator for Rider Behavior Research

  • Alex W. Stedmon
  • David Crundall
  • Elizabeth Crundall
  • Rose Saikayasit
  • Editha van Loon
  • Alex Irune
  • Patrick Ward
  • Neil Greig
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 174)

Abstract

In order to compare groups of road users who have fundamentally different skills, attitudes and behaviours, one of the first in-depth motorcycle simulation studies of its kind was conducted. The project was developed using the innovative ‘MotorcycleSim’ simulator designed and built at the University of Nottingham. The simulator is a research tool to investigate aspects of motorcycle ergonomics and rider human factors and is the first of its kind in the world to incorporate ‘STI-SIM Drive’ software that allows motorcyclists to ride a full size motorcycle and interact with a virtual riding environment (VRE). To build a simulator that was both fit for the purpose of research and provided the desired levels of fidelity associated with real world riding, a user-centred design process was adopted from the outset (based in principles of ISO:13407).

Keywords

transport simulation motorcycles rider behavior 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Stedmon, A.W., Brickell, E., Hancox, M., Noble, J., Rice, D.: MotorcycleSim: a user-centred approach for an innovative motorcycle simulator. In: Golightly, D., Rose, T., Bonner, J., Boyd Davis, S. (eds.) Creative Inventions & Innovations for Everyday HCI. The Ergonomics Society, Leicester (2008)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Stedmon, A.W., Young, M., Hasseldine, B.: Keeping it real or faking it: The trials and tribulations or real road studies and simulator research in transport research. In: Bust, P. (ed.) Contemporary Ergonomics 2009. Taylor & Francis, London (2009)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Stedmon, A.W., Hasseldine, B., Rice, D., Young, M., Markham, S., Hancox, M., Brickell, E., Noble, J.: MotorcycleSim: an evaluation of rider interaction with an innovative motorcycle simulator. The Computer Journal (2009), doi:10.1093/comjnl/bxp071Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Earthy, J., Sherwood Jones, B., Bevan, N.: The improvement of human-centred processes: Facing the challenge and reaping the benefit of ISO:13407. International Journal of Human Computer Studies 55(4), 553–585 (2001)CrossRefzbMATHGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Stone, R.J.: Virtual Reality. Virtual and Synthetic Environments: Technologies and Applications. In: Karkowski, W. (ed.) International Encyclopaedia of Ergonomics and Human Factors. Taylor & Francis, London (2001)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Stedmon, A.W., Crundall, D., Crundall, E., Saikayasit, R., Ward, P., van Loon, E., Irune, A.A.: Advanced Training & Rider Performance. University of Nottingham (2010)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alex W. Stedmon
    • 1
  • David Crundall
    • 2
  • Elizabeth Crundall
    • 2
  • Rose Saikayasit
    • 1
  • Editha van Loon
    • 2
  • Alex Irune
    • 3
  • Patrick Ward
    • 2
  • Neil Greig
    • 4
  1. 1.Centre for Motorcycle Ergonomics & Rider Human FactorsUniversity of NottinghamUK
  2. 2.School of PsychologyUniversity of NottinghamUK
  3. 3.Dimax Technology LtdNottinghamUK
  4. 4.The Institute of Advanced MotoristsIAM HouseLondonUK

Personalised recommendations