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Use of Neurophysiological Metrics within a Real and Virtual Perceptual Skills Task to Determine Optimal Simulation Fidelity Requirements

  • Jack Vice
  • Anna Skinner
  • Chris Berka
  • Lauren Reinerman-Jones
  • Daniel Barber
  • Nicholas Pojman
  • Veasna Tan
  • Marc Sebrechts
  • Corinna Lathan
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6773)

Abstract

The military is increasingly looking to virtual environment (VE) developers and cognitive scientists to provide virtual training platforms to support optimal training effectiveness within significant time and cost constraints. However, current methods for determining the most effective levels of fidelity in these environments are limited. Neurophysiological metrics may provide a means for objectively assessing the impact of fidelity variations on training. The current experiment compared neurophysiological and performance data for a real-world perceptual discrimination task as well as a similarly-structured VE training task under systematically varied fidelity conditions. Visual discrimination and classification was required between two militarily-relevant (M-16 and AK-47 rifle), and one neutral (umbrella) stimuli, viewed through a real and virtual Night Vision Device. Significant differences were found for task condition (real world versus virtual, as well as visual stimulus parameters within each condition), within both the performance and physiological data.

Keywords

Virtual Environment Stimulus Type Task Environment Real World Condition Color Depth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack Vice
    • 1
  • Anna Skinner
    • 1
  • Chris Berka
    • 3
  • Lauren Reinerman-Jones
    • 2
  • Daniel Barber
    • 2
  • Nicholas Pojman
    • 3
  • Veasna Tan
    • 3
  • Marc Sebrechts
    • 4
  • Corinna Lathan
    • 1
  1. 1.AnthroTronix, Inc.USA
  2. 2.Institute for Simulation and TrainingUniversity of Central Florida 3100 TechnologyOrlandoUSA
  3. 3.Advanced Brain Monitoring, Inc.USA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyThe Catholic University of AmericaNE WashingtonUSA

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