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Simultaneous Measurement of Lens Accommodation and Convergence to Real Objects

  • Tomoki Shiomi
  • Hiromu Ishio
  • Hiroki Hori
  • Hiroki Takada
  • Masako Omori
  • Satoshi Hasegawa
  • Shohei Matsunuma
  • Akira Hasegawa
  • Tetsuya Kanda
  • Masaru Miyao
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6773)

Abstract

Human beings can perceive that objects are three-dimensional (3D) as a result of simultaneous lens accommodation and convergence on objects, which is possible because humans can see so that parallax occurs with the right and left eye. Virtual images are perceived via the same mechanism, but the influence of binocular vision on human visual function is insufficiently understood. In this study, we developed a method to simultaneously measure accommodation and convergence in order to provide further support for our previous research findings. We also measured accommodation and convergence in natural vision to confirm that these measurements are correct. As a result, we found that both accommodation and convergence were consistent with the distance from the subject to the object. Therefore, it can be said that the present measurement method is an effective technique for the measurement of visual function, and that even during stereoscopic vision correct values can be obtained.

Keywords

simultaneous measurement eye movement accommodation and convergence natural vision 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tomoki Shiomi
    • 1
  • Hiromu Ishio
    • 1
  • Hiroki Hori
    • 1
  • Hiroki Takada
    • 2
  • Masako Omori
    • 3
  • Satoshi Hasegawa
    • 4
  • Shohei Matsunuma
    • 5
  • Akira Hasegawa
    • 1
  • Tetsuya Kanda
    • 1
  • Masaru Miyao
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Information ScienceNagoya UniversityChikusa-kuJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of EngineeringFukui UniversityFukuiJapan
  3. 3.Facility of Home EconomicsKobe Women’s UniversitySumakuJapan
  4. 4.Department of Information and Media StudiesNagoya Bunri UniversityInazawaJapan
  5. 5.Nagoya Industrial Science Research Institutenaka-kuJapan

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