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3-D Sound Reproduction System for Immersive Environments Based on the Boundary Surface Control Principle

  • Seigo Enomoto
  • Yusuke Ikeda
  • Shiro Ise
  • Satoshi Nakamura
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6773)

Abstract

We constructed a 3-D sound reproduction system containing a 62-channel loudspeaker array and 70-channel microphone array based on the boundary surface control principle (BoSC). The microphone array can record the volume of the 3-D sound field and the loudspeaker array can accurately recreate it in other locations. Using these systems, we realized immersive acoustic environments similar to cinema or television sound spaces. We also recorded real 3-D acoustic environments, such as an orchestra performance and forest sounds, by using the microphone array. Recreated sound fields were evaluated by demonstration experiments using the 3-D sound field. Subjective assessments of 390 subjects confirm that these systems can achieve high presence for 3-D sound reproduction and provide the listener with deep immersion.

Keywords

Boundary surface control principle Immersive environments Virtual reality Stereophony Surround sound 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seigo Enomoto
    • 1
  • Yusuke Ikeda
    • 1
  • Shiro Ise
    • 2
  • Satoshi Nakamura
    • 1
  1. 1.Spoken Language Communication GroupNational Institute of Information and Communications TechnologyKeihanna Science CityJapan
  2. 2.Graduate school of engineering, Department of Architecture and architectural engineeringKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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