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Enhancing Team Performance Using Neurophysiologic Synchronies in a Virtual Training Environment

  • Marianne Clark
  • Kimberly Cellucci
  • Chris Berka
  • Daniel J. Levendowski
  • Jonny Trejo
  • Amy Kruse
  • Ron Stevens
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6780)

Abstract

A study was conducted to investigate the use of neurophysiologic synchronies as a measurement of team cognition (1) in a military-style virtual environment simulation. Neurophysiologic synchronies (NS), defined as the second-by-second quantitative co-expression of the levels of cognitive measures by individual members of a team (8), were found to be useful in monitoring the quality of teamwork and to be a means to identify more optimal patterns of team interaction which can be used to provide feedback during training. In the current study, findings showed promise for further research in the collection of NS. A framework is also proposed to support the research and training of team cognition.

Keywords

Team performance team cognition shared mental models collaboration neurophysiologic synchronies electroencephalography (EEG) virtual environments mission rehearsal training RealWorld 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marianne Clark
    • 1
  • Kimberly Cellucci
    • 1
  • Chris Berka
    • 2
  • Daniel J. Levendowski
    • 2
  • Jonny Trejo
    • 2
  • Amy Kruse
    • 3
  • Ron Stevens
    • 4
  1. 1.Scientific Research CorporationCharleston
  2. 2.Advanced Brain Monitoring, Inc.Carlsbad
  3. 3.Total Immersion SoftwareArlington
  4. 4.IMMEX Project/UCLALos Angeles

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