Advertisement

The Comparison of Different Sensory Outputs on the Driving Overtake Alarm System

  • Yu-Chun Huang
  • Chia-Jung Tsai
  • Jo-Yu Kuo
  • Fong-Gong Wu
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6767)

Abstract

Most car accidents are caused by improper driving behaviors. Studies have shown that changing lanes improperly is one of the main causes of traffic accidents. This shows that drivers need an assisting alarm system to help them avoid the danger during overtaking. We also found that the existing alarm system and researches try to use different sensory outputs as the alarm signals. However, there were no studies to compare how the different sensory alarm signals affect the drivers. Therefore, in this study, we have setup three kinds of alarm signals (visual, sound, and haptic alarm signals) to see which one is more suitable at the high speed context. On top of that, the sensitivity of the alarm system may be the other key factor that affects drivers’ behaviors. So, we manipulate two most commonly shown alarm signal frequencies when the driver feels threatened. The results of this study have proven that the sound and haptic signals are better than visual outputs when drivers are put in a high visual loading situation. This result could be the guideline for future designers of a driving alarm system.

Keywords

Overtake Alarm System Haptic signal 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Wickens, C.D.: Processing resources in attention. In: Parasuraman, R., Davies, R. (eds.) Varieties of Attention, pp. 63–101 (1984)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Patrick, R.E., Elias, L.J.: Navigational conversation impairs concurrent distance judgments. Accident Analysis and Prevention 41, 36–41 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Nass, C., Jonsson, I., Harris, H., Reaves, B., Endo, J., Brave, S., Takayama, L.: Improving automotive safety by pairing driver emotion and car voice emotion. In: CHI, Portland, Oregon, USA, April 2-7 (2005)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ho, C., Tan, H.Z., Spence, C.: Using spatial vibrotactile cues to direct visual attention in driving scenes. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour 8, 397–412 (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Spence, C., Driver, J.: Cross-modal links in attention between audition, vision, and touch: Implications for interface design. International Journal of Cognitive Ergonomics 1, 351–373 (1997)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Jeffrey, J., Scott, Rob, G.: Comparison of driver brake reaction times to multimodal rearend collision warnings. In: The Fourth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design (2009) Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Mohebbi, R., Gray, R., Tan, H.: Driver Reaction Time to Tactile and Auditory Rear- End Collision Warnings While Talking on a Cell Phone Human Factors. The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 51, 102 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Godthelp, J., Schuman, J.: Intelligent accelerator: An element of driver support. In: Parkes, A.M., Frazen, S. (eds.) Driving Future Vehicles, pp. 265–275. Taylor & Francis, London (1993)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Ho, C., Reed, N., Spence, C.: Assessing the effectiveness of “intuitive” vibrotactile warning signals in preventing frontto- rear-end collisions in a driving simulator. Accident Analysis & Prevention 38, 989–997 (2006)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Ho, C., Spence, C.: Using peripersonal warning signals to orient a driver’s gaze. Human Factors 51(4), 539–556 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Van Erp, J.B.F., van Veen, H.A.H.C.: Vibro-tactile information presentation in automobiles. In: Berber, C., Faint, M., Wall, S., Wing, A.M. (eds.) Proceedings of Eurohaptics 2001, pp. 99–104. University of Birmingham, Birmingham (2001)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Atsuo, M., Kohki, T., Makoto, M.: Fifth International Workshop on Computational Intelligence & Applications (2009)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Cristy, H., Hong, Z.T., Charles, S.: Using spatial vibrotactile cues to direct visual attention in driving scenes. Transportation Research Part F 8, 397–412 (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    De Vries, S.C., Van Erp, J.B.F., Raymond, J.K.: Direction coding using a tactile chair. Applied Ergonomics 40, 477–484 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Mckeown, D., Isherwood, S., Conway, G.: Auditory displays as occasion setters. Hum. Factors 52(1), 54–62 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Rayka, M., Rob, G., Hong, Z.T.: Driver Reaction Time to Tactile and Auditory Rear-End Collision Warnings While Talking on a Cell Phone Human Factors. The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 51, 102 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yu-Chun Huang
    • 1
  • Chia-Jung Tsai
    • 1
  • Jo-Yu Kuo
    • 1
  • Fong-Gong Wu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Industrial DesignNational Cheng Kung UniversityTainanTaiwan

Personalised recommendations