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Modelling Cognitive Impairment to Improve Universal Access

  • Elina Jokisuu
  • Patrick Langdon
  • P. John Clarkson
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6766)

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to develop a model of cognitive impairment to help designers consider the range of issues which affect the lives of people living with such impairment. A series of interviews with experts of cognitive impairment was conducted to describe and assess the links between specific medical conditions, including learning disability, specific learning difficulties, autistic spectrum disorders, traumatic brain injury and schizophrenia, and the types of cognitive impairment associated with them. The results reveal some of the most prevalent and serious types of impairment, which – when transformed into design guidance – will help designers make mainstream products more inclusive also for people with cognitive impairment.

Keywords

Cognitive impairment medical classification functional capability design guidance 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elina Jokisuu
    • 1
  • Patrick Langdon
    • 1
  • P. John Clarkson
    • 1
  1. 1.Engineering Design CentreUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUnited Kingdom

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