Unifying Approach to Hybrid Control Software

  • Michael Stolz
  • Bernhard Knauder
  • Petr Micek
  • Wolfgang Ebner
  • Evgeny Korsunsky
  • Peter Ebner
Part of the VDI-Buch book series (VDI-BUCH)

Abstract

The presented work focuses on a generic software architecture as a basis for complex hybrid control and energy management strategies for a very wide range of applications. A clear and transparent mode prioritization together with the requests generation form the fundamental structure within the proposed architecture which always ensures the secure handling of the complex system. Different application dependent hybrid features can easily be attached onto this core enabling calibration as well as testing in a straightforward manner due to their capsulation. The lean interfaces between core software and additional hybrid features are designed in a way to support software re-usability and scalability. Because of the very generic approach, derived control software can serve the entire spectrum from micro to full hybrid. The working principles of hybrid feature selection, request generation and mode transition are presented in detail for a selected example.

Keywords

Model Predictive Control Hybrid Electric Vehicle Hybrid Vehicle Hybrid Mode Drive Train 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    This work was supported in part by COMET K2-Competence Centres for Excellent Technologies Programme.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Stolz
    • 1
  • Bernhard Knauder
    • 1
  • Petr Micek
    • 1
  • Wolfgang Ebner
    • 1
  • Evgeny Korsunsky
    • 1
  • Peter Ebner
    • 2
  1. 1.Kompetenzzentrum Das virtuelle Fahrzeug Forschungsgesellschaft mbHGrazAustria
  2. 2.AVL List GmbHGrazAustria

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