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Qualitative Techniques

  • Massimo Lazzaroni
  • Loredana Cristaldi
  • Lorenzo Peretto
  • Paola Rinaldi
  • Marcantonio Catelani
Chapter
  • 1.9k Downloads

Abstract

In the previous chapter quantitative methods useful for reliability evaluation have been presented. Here the evaluation of the behavior of a system is conduit with analytical and graphic methods. A second way to study the behavior of a system is based on a qualitative approach. These methods are able to understand the mechanism of the system failures and are able to identify all the potential weakness of the system under evaluation. Two main techniques of analysis are used and will be presented in this chapter: the Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) and the Failure modes effects and criticality analysis (FMECA). Such techniques are able to highlight the failure mode leading to a negative final effect. A third method here presented is based on a quite different approach. Fault Tree Analysis (FTA), a deductive method, in fact starts from the final effect studying the causes of a particular and well defined failure.

Keywords

Failure Mode Light Emit Diode Print Circuit Board Risk Priority Number Design Review 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Massimo Lazzaroni
    • Loredana Cristaldi
      • Lorenzo Peretto
        • Paola Rinaldi
          • Marcantonio Catelani

            There are no affiliations available

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