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The Effect of Subharmonic Stimuli on Singing Voices

  • Marena Balinova
  • Peter Reichl
  • Inma Hernáez Rioja
  • Ibon Saratxaga
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6456)

Abstract

Unlike harmonics, which play a central role in the spectral analysis of voice signals, the equivalent concept of subharmonics is traditionally considered to be a rather theoretical one. In this paper, we introduce an approach for using them as stimuli in the context of voice teaching for opera singers. Starting from the observation that faulty vocal technique may be perceived by specifically trained listeners as lack of certain subharmonics in the vocal structure, we are interested in adaptation phenomena on the singer’s side which are triggered by playing low notes (potentially corresponding to those subharmonics) on a piano immediately prior to the execution of certain musical phrases. As a first step, we report on some initial experiments on the impact of such stimuli on the observed harmonic spectrum, and thus explore how such a novel voice formation approach could benefit from adequate signal processing support.

Keywords

Singing voice harmonic spectrum subharmonics voice teaching 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marena Balinova
    • 1
  • Peter Reichl
    • 1
    • 2
  • Inma Hernáez Rioja
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ibon Saratxaga
    • 3
  1. 1.University of Applied Sciences Technikum WienViennaAustria
  2. 2.FTW Telecommunications Research Center ViennaViennaAustria
  3. 3.AHOLABUniversity of the Basque CountryBilbaoSpain

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