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Modern Tennis Physiology

  • Tijana T. Ivancevic
  • Bojan Jovanovic
  • Sasa Jovanovic
  • Milka Djukic
  • Natalia Djukic
  • Alexandar Lukman
Part of the Cognitive Systems Monographs book series (COSMOS, volume 12)

Abstract

Human skeletal and face muscles, accounting for more than 40% of the body weight in man, consist of bundles of elongated, cylindric cells called muscle fibers, 50 to 200 μ in diameter and often many centimeters long. Bundles of muscle fibers, each called fasciculus, are surrounded by a connective tissue covering, the endomysium (see, e.g., [Mou80, Mar98]).

A muscle consists of a number of fasciculi encased in a thick outer layer of connective tissue, the perimysium. At both ends of a muscle the connective tissue melds into a tendon by which the muscle is attached to the face or bony skeleton. In some muscles (fusiform), the muscle fibers run the whole length of muscle between the tendons, which form at opposite ends. In most muscles (pennate), one of the tendons penetrates through the center of the muscle; muscle fibers run at an angle to the axis of the whole muscle from the central tendon to the perimysium.

Keywords

Spinal Cord Purkinje Cell Granule Cell Muscle Spindle White Muscle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tijana T. Ivancevic
    • Bojan Jovanovic
      • Sasa Jovanovic
        • Milka Djukic
          • Natalia Djukic
            • Alexandar Lukman

              There are no affiliations available

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