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Complexity at the Fundamental Level

  • Antonino ZichichiEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Physics book series (SPPHY, volume 134)

Abstract

Purpose of this lecture is to show that Complexity in the real world exists, no matter the Mass–Energy and Space–Time scales considered, including the fundamental one. To prove this it is necessary: To identify the experimentally observable effects which call for the existence of Complexity; To analyse how we have discovered the most advanced frontier of Science: the SM&B (Standard Model and Beyond); To construct the platonic version of this frontier: i.e., what would be the ideal platonic Simplicity.

Keywords

Gauge Coupling Renormalization Group Equation Fundamental Level Symmetry Operator Strange Particle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.CERNGenevaSwitzerland
  2. 2.Enrico Fermi CentreRomeItaly
  3. 3.INFN and University of BolognaBolognaItaly

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