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Drug Residues

  • Philip T. ReevesEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology book series (HEP, volume 199)

Abstract

The use of veterinary drugs in animal production is necessary for the prevention and treatment of disease; however, such use may result in residues. Regulatory authorities administer legislative frameworks which ensure that foods derived from animals treated with approved veterinary drugs are safe for human consumption. A human food safety evaluation is conducted as follows: it estimates the risk to human health and safety – based on scientific assessment of the available information and data – formulates measures for controlling the risks identified, and communicates the findings and implications of the risk assessment to interested parties. Foods derived from animals are monitored for the presence of drug residues. The reported incidence of illegal residues from these programmes is very low. These findings reassure the public that veterinary drugs are effectively regulated and that food obtained from treated animals does not contain residues that might constitute a health hazard to consumers. Non-regulatory organizations, including the veterinary pharmaceutical industry, producer organisations, veterinarians and food processors, all contribute to a safe food supply. The food safety risk analysis framework is continually refined to ensure that the health of all consumers is protected.

Keywords

Regulation Veterinary Drug Residue Food Safety Risk analysis Trade 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The author wishes to thank APVMA Science Fellows Emeritus Prof. Jock McLean, Dr Dieter Arnold and Prof. Terry O’Neill, and Assoc. Prof. Steven Stern for their comments on this manuscript. The assistance of Dr Cheryl Javro with preparation of the figures and Ms Adrienne Walker with manuscript formatting is gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines AuthorityKingstonAustralia

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