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Computer Analysis of Lighting in Realist Master Art: Current Methods and Future Challenges

  • David G. Stork
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5716)

Abstract

We review several computer based techniques for analyzing the lighting in images that have proven valuable when addressing questions in the history and interpretation of realist art. These techniques fall into two general classes: model independent (where one makes no assumption about the three-dimensional shape of the rendered objects) and model dependent (where one does make some assumptions about their three-dimensional shape). An additiona, statistical algorithm integrates the estimates of lighting position or direction produced by different such techniques. We conclude by discussing several outstanding problems and future directions in the analysis of lighting in realist art.

Keywords

computer vision computer image analysis of art occluding contour algorithm cast shadow analysis computer graphics constructions tableau virtuel 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • David G. Stork
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Ricoh InnovationsMenlo ParkUSA
  2. 2.Department of StatisticsStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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