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The “Rush Hour” of Life: Insecurities and Strains in Early Life Phases as a Challenge for a Life Course-Oriented, Sustainable Social Policy

  • Ute KlammerEmail author
Conference paper

Abstract

In order to get a wider scope, one should look not only into different income patterns and familial time arrangements at a certain point in time, but also at how these patterns develop through a respective life course. Certain working time models, such as regular or marginal part-time, must be analysed with regard to the long-term effect on the workers employed under such conditions. Are these short episodes of employment only temporarily accepted at certain points of time, e.g. at point of career entry or during times of increased need? Or, are these work forms permanently obtained – be it “voluntarily”1 or not? In certain strata of the work force, is there a concentration of problematic working time models, such as part-time employment? Which financial consequences for the income and social transfers are there for unemployment or part-time work in the long run? Do uncertain labour perspectives lead to delays or even to the renunciation of parenthood and family – and do uncertain labour perspectives, in this respect, have a direct impact on the demographic “problem” of low fertility rates?

Keywords

Labour Market Labour Market Participation Labour Participation European Community Household Panel Care Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Duisburg-EssenEssenGermany

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