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German Bundestag Survey on Intergenerational Justice in the Labour Market

  • Joerg Chet TremmelEmail author
  • Patrick Wegner
Conference paper
  • 644 Downloads

Abstract

Nowadays, most welfare transfer payments are made to the older generation, especially to cover pensions, nursing, and health costs. As far as distributive justice is concerned, redistributions among age groups are not unjust as such, because everybody ages. People usually experience both the state of youth and of old age during their lives, whereas they obviously keep their ethnicity and gender all life long. This distinguishes matters of intergenerational justice from gender justice or ethnic justice (Daniels 1988).

Keywords

Labour Market Young Generation Indirect Comparison Policy Field Young Employee 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The London School of Economics and Political ScienceLondonUK
  2. 2.Foundation for the Rights of Future GenerationsOberurselGermany

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