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Polarisation or Convergence? Spatial Patterns of Fertility in Hungary 15 Years after the Beginning of the Process of Transformation

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Part of the German Annual of Spatial Research and Policy book series (GERMANANNUAL)

Abstract

The transition from state socialism to democracy and a market economy entailed not only political, social, and economic changes, but also a demographic turning point. The reproductive pattern of the socialist era was characterised by high rates of births, marriages, and divorces1 in comparison with other European countries and a close link between marriage and reproduction.2 Since 1990, the significance of marriage has declined, and at the same time a spectacular drop in fertility has been observed.3

Keywords

Reproductive Behaviour Total Fertility Rate Demographic Transition Regional Disparity Labour Force Participation Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Leibniz Institute for Regional Geography (IfL)LeipzigGermany

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