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Tactical Access to Complex Technology through Interactive Communication (TACTIC)

  • Alexei Samoylov
  • Christopher Franklin
  • Susan Harkness Regli
  • Patrice Tremoulet
  • Kathleen Stibler
  • Peter Gerken
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5617)

Abstract

Tactical Access to Complex Technology through Interactive Communication (TACTIC) is a user interface prototype developed under a technology effort designed to provide personnel deployed in the field with access to resources that typically require intercession by stationary experts with extensive training and experience. We present rationale behind a computer system that judiciously and beneficially exposes expert knowledge to novices, outline the domains in which such a system is applicable and describe a prototype interface implementation in the domain of military expeditionary forces.

Keywords

expert knowledge interface workflow expeditionary forces 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexei Samoylov
    • 1
  • Christopher Franklin
    • 1
  • Susan Harkness Regli
    • 1
  • Patrice Tremoulet
    • 1
  • Kathleen Stibler
    • 1
  • Peter Gerken
    • 1
  1. 1.Advanced Technology Laboratories, Lockheed MartinCherry HillUnited States

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