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Risk Assessment and Economic Applications – the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety: GMO Approval and Import on a World-Wide Scale

  • Joachim BendiekEmail author
  • Hans-Jörg Buhk
Chapter
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 64)

Abstract

The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety to the Convention on Biological Diversity sets a standard for the procedures of decision-making regarding the transboundary movement of living modified organisms (LMO) or genetically modified organisms (GMOs), as they are widely called. The Cartagena Protocol obligates Parties to the Protocol to implement its provisions into national legislation. Different approaches are realised in different countries. Examples on decision-making are given for the placing on the market of GMOs in the European Union (EU) and the EU Member States as Parties to the Cartagena Protocol. This approach is contrasted with the idea of the United States which is a Non-Party. Different labelling requirements and asynchrony of GMO authorisation for commercial use influence the international trade.

Keywords

European Union Competent Authority Environmental Risk Assessment Genetically Modify Organism Modern Biotechnology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Bundesamt für Verbraucherschutz und Lebensmittelsicherheit (BVL)BerlinGermany

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