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Magnetic Domains

  • Alberto P. GuimarãesEmail author
Chapter
Part of the NanoScience and Technology book series (NANO)

Summary

The existence of magnetic domains arises from the effect of several interactions present in magnetic materials, mainly exchange, anisotropy and dipolar. This chapter deals with some properties of magnetic domains and magnetic domain walls, including the motion of these walls under an applied magnetic field. A short introduction to micromagnetism, an approach to the study of magnetic materials that considers these materials as a continuum, is also given, as well as the origin of some of the characteristic lengths in magnetism.

Keywords

Domain Wall Magnetic Domain Anisotropy Energy Domain Wall Motion Magnetic Domain Wall 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. A. Aharoni, Introduction to the Theory of Ferromagnetism, 2nd edn. (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000)Google Scholar
  2. G. Bertotti, Hysteresis in Magnetism (Academic Press, San Diego, 1998)Google Scholar
  3. A.P. Guimarães, Magnetism and Magnetic Resonance in Solids (Wiley, New York, 1998)Google Scholar
  4. G. Herzer, J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 294, 99–106 (2005)CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  5. A. Hubert, R. Schäfer, Magnetic Domains. The Analysis of Magnetic Microstructures (Springer, Berlin, 1999)Google Scholar
  6. H. Kronmüller, M. Fähnle, Micromagnetism and the Microstructure of Ferromagnetic Solids (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2003)Google Scholar
  7. H. Kronmüller, in General Micromagnetic Theory, ed. by H. Kronmüller, S. Parkin. Handbook of Magnetism and Advanced Magnetic Materials, vol 2 (Wiley, Chichester, 2007), pp. 703–741Google Scholar
  8. A.P. Malozemoff, J.C. Slonczewski, Magnetic Domain Walls in Bubble Materials (Academic Press, New York, 1979)Google Scholar
  9. R.C. O’Handley. Modern Magnetic Materials (Wiley, New York, 2000)Google Scholar
  10. R. Skomski, J.M.D. Coey, Permanent Magnetism (Institute of Physics, Bristol, 1999)Google Scholar
  11. R. Skomski, J. Zhou, in Nanomagnetic Models, ed. by D. Sellmyer, R. Skomski. Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures (Springer, New York, 2006)Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas (CBPF)Rio de Janeiro - RJBrasil/Brazil

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