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Nasal CPAP: An Evidence-Based Assessment

  • Sherry E. CourtneyEmail author
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Abstract

Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) has become extremely popular over the past few years. Though its use is based in strong physiologic principles, data as to the beneficial short- and long-term effects as well as possible complications are still lacking to a great degree. Personal opinions and biases have played a role in this arena as well. In this chapter, we will describe the major ways to provide NCPAP that are currently employed as of this writing. We will then discuss the studies of NCPAP that have been done to date and classify them according to level of evidence. Finally, we will draw some conclusions based on the evidence presented and suggest areas for future investigation.

Keywords

Preterm Infant Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Nasal Cannula Extubation Failure Exogenous Surfactant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Section of Neonatology, Department of PediatricsUniversity of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children’s HospitalLittle RockUSA

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