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Singularities in Fluid Dynamics and their Resolution

  • H. K. MoffattEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Mathematics book series (LNM, volume 1973)

Abstract

Three types of singularity that can arise in fluid dynamical problems will be distinguished and discussed. These are: (i) singularities driven by boundary motion in conjunction with viscosity (e.g. corner singularities, or the Euler-disc finite-time singularity); (ii) free-surface (cusp) singularities associated with surface-tension and viscosity; (iii) interior point singularities of vorticity associated with intense vortex stretching. The singularities of types (i) and (ii) are now well known, and mechanisms by which the singularities may be resolved are clear. The question of existence of singularities of type (iii) is still open; current evidence for and against will be discussed.

Keywords

Capillary Number Vortex Tube Vorticity Equation Vorticity Distribution Corner Singularity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical PhysicsUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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