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Reactive Oxygen Species in Plant–Pathogen Interactions

  • G. Paul BolwellEmail author
  • Arsalan Daudi
Chapter
Part of the Signaling and Communication in Plants book series (SIGCOMM)

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide are produced at all levels of resistance reactions in plants. In basal resistance, they are linked to papilla formation and the assembly of barriers. In the hypersensitive response, they may be linked to programmed cell death, and in systemic acquired resistance, they interact with salicylate in signalling. Despite this importance, there is still a need to dissect the identities, activation and relative contributions of the ROS generating systems. Progress, however, is being made in identifying the molecular targets at the transcriptional, protein and cellular structure levels that are regulated by ROS in coordinating resistance responses.

Keywords

Reactive Oxygen Species Salicylic Acid Reactive Oxygen Species Production Hypersensitive Response Oxidative Burst 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Biological Sciences, Royal Holloway, University of LondonEghamUK

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