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UML Diagrams Supporting Domain Specification Inside the CRUTIAL Project

  • Davide Cerotti
  • Daniele Codetta-Raiteri
  • Susanna Donatelli
  • Claudio Brasca
  • Giovanna Dondossola
  • Fabrizio Garrone
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5141)

Abstract

The paper proposes the representation in form of UML Class Diagrams of the electric power system (EPS) intended to be composed by two kinds of interdependent infrastructures: the physical infrastructure for the production and the distribution of the electric power, and the ICT infrastructure for the control, the management and the monitoring of the physical infrastructure. Such work was developed inside the EU funded project CRUTIAL pursuing the resilience of the EPS. The paper first motivates the use of UML. Then, several UML Class Diagrams representing the EPS domain are presented and described. Finally, an example of critical scenario is represented by means of UML diagrams.

Keywords

Electric Power System UML Class Diagrams critical scenario modelling CRUTIAL 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Davide Cerotti
    • 1
    • 2
  • Daniele Codetta-Raiteri
    • 1
    • 2
  • Susanna Donatelli
    • 1
    • 3
  • Claudio Brasca
    • 4
  • Giovanna Dondossola
    • 4
  • Fabrizio Garrone
    • 4
  1. 1.Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Telecomunicazioni (CNIT)Italy
  2. 2.Dipartimento di InformaticaUniversità del Piemonte OrientaleAlessandriaItaly
  3. 3.Dipartimento di InformaticaUniversità di TorinoTorinoItaly
  4. 4.CESI RicercaMilanoItaly

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