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X-LES Simulations Using a High-Order Finite-Volume Scheme

  • Johan C. Kok
  • Bambang I. Soemarwoto
  • Harmen van der Ven
Part of the Notes on Numerical Fluid Mechanics and Multidisciplinary Design book series (NNFM, volume 97)

Abstract

This paper focuses on numerical aspects for hybrid RANS–LES computations using the X-LES method. In particular, the impact of using a high-order finite-volume scheme is considered. The finite-volume scheme is fourth-order accurate on non-uniform, curvilinear grids, has low numerical dispersion and dissipation, and is based on the skew-symmetric form of the compressible convection operator, which ensures that kinetic energy is conserved by convection. A limited grid convergence study is performed for the flow over a rounded bump in a square duct. The fourth-order results are shown to depend only mildly on the grid resolution. In contrast, second-order results require at least half the mesh size to become comparable to the fourth-order results. Additionally, the high-order method is extended with shock-capturing capability in such a way that interference with the subgrid-scale model is avoided. The suitability of this extension is demonstrated by means of a supersonic flow over a cavity.

Keywords

Artificial Viscosity Filter Width Curvilinear Grid Artificial Diffusion Grid Convergence Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Johan C. Kok
    • 1
  • Bambang I. Soemarwoto
    • 1
  • Harmen van der Ven
    • 1
  1. 1.National Aerospace Laboratory NLRThe Netherlands

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