Advertisement

The Renewable Energy Sources Act (EEG) as German Way of a Future-Oriented Energy Policy Change

  • André Zschiegner
  • Emmanuel WankiEmail author
Chapter
  • 864 Downloads
Part of the Environmental Protection in the European Union book series (ENVPROTEC, volume 4)

Abstract

In our modern, technology-based society the constant—actually unlimited—availability of raw materials of energy at low economical costs is a central functional condition. Both the German economy and private households depend heavily on the sufficient supply of cheap energy. The continuous and very one-sided focus on conventional forms of energy is increasingly proving to be a problem because the unpredictability of long-term ecological consequences of the use of fossil energy carriers on the global climate on one hand and the uncontrollability of the risks of atomic energy generation on the other set tasks on our society that can hardly be solved. Furthermore, the limited availability of fossil energy carriers coupled with increasing global energy needs is proving to be a problem. The constantly increasing energy needs of established industrialized nations have, in recent years, met the rapidly increasing demand for energy of transition countries such as China, India or Brazil. In view of the increasing shortage of resources, this has lead to horrific price development in world markets. On a long-term basis, the goal of a conscious energy policy—national as well as international—can therefore only be the development and establishment of alternative energy generation concepts based on regenerative energy carriers. However, the implementation of this objective in practice proves to be very problematic.

In our modern, technology-based society the constant—actually unlimited—availability of raw materials of energy at low economical costs is a central functional condition. Both the German economy and private households depend heavily on the sufficient supply of cheap energy. The continuous and very one-sided focus on conventional forms of energy is increasingly proving to be a problem because the unpredictability of long-term ecological consequences of the use of fossil energy carriers on the global climate on one hand and the uncontrollability of the risks of atomic energy generation on the other set tasks on our society that can hardly be solved. Furthermore, the limited availability of fossil energy carriers coupled with increasing global energy needs is proving to be a problem. The constantly increasing energy needs of established industrialized nations have, in recent years, met the rapidly increasing demand for energy of transition countries such as China, India or Brazil. In view of the increasing shortage of resources, this has lead to horrific price development in world markets. On a long-term basis, the goal of a conscious energy policy—national as well as international—can therefore only be the development and establishment of alternative energy generation concepts based on regenerative energy carriers. However, the implementation of this objective in practice proves to be very problematic.

Keywords

Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Source Grid System Electricity Price Nuclear Safety 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Ellenberger J (2014) Commentary on the Art. 104. In: Palandt O (ed) Bürgerliches Gesetzbuch – Kommentar (German Civil Code). C.H. Beck, MunichGoogle Scholar
  2. Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (2009) The explanation to the EEG 2009. Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  3. Jarass HD, Pieroth B (2009) Basic law for the federal republic of Germany: GG. C. H. Beck, MunichGoogle Scholar
  4. Maslaton M, Zschiegner A (2009) Handbook of the law of photovoltaics. Verlag Für Alternatives Energierecht, LeipzigGoogle Scholar
  5. Salje P (2008) EEG 2008: renewable energy sources act, 2nd edn. Carl Heymanns, CologneGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Civil and Public Law with References to the Law of Europe and the EnvironmentBrandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-SenftenbergCottbusGermany
  2. 2.Department of Civil and Public Law with References to the Law of Europe and the EnvironmentBrandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-SenftenbergCottbusGermany

Personalised recommendations