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Making All Persons Work: Modern Danish Labour Market Policies

Chapter

A better understanding of the types and effects of labour market policies is high on political and academic research agendas. Globalisation requires flexible labour markets, and ageing populations stress the need for more labour supply. Both factors highlight the role of labour market policies in reducing unemployment and increasing employment. How can we design and implement labour market policies so they work as best they can? This paper presents the Danish situation and some of the experiences made in the 1990s and 2000s.

This paper contributes to a better understanding of the changing nature of Danish labour market policies and experiences made. The paper sets out the Danish situation of the political ideas of activation (Sect. 2), changing target groups (Sect. 3), labour law (Sect. 4), unemployment insurance (Sect. 5), activation (Sect. 6), and their outcomes (Sect. 7).

Keywords

Labour Market Unemployment Benefit Social Assistance Unemployment Insurance Social Partner 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SFI – The Danish National Social Research CentreDenmark
  2. 2.The Research Department on Employment and Labour Market IssuesThe Danish National Centre of Social ResearchDenmark
  3. 3.The Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Social Law in MunichGermany

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