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Alternative Splicing in Plant Defense

  • W. Gassmann
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 326)

Plant resistance proteins directly or indirectly perceive the presence of pathogen virulence factors and trigger an effective form of plant immunity that often includes programmed host cell death. Because the activation of resistance proteins has the potential to be detrimental to the plant, this process is tightly regulated on multiple levels. Several resistance genes have been shown to be alternatively spliced. Depending on the resistance gene, alternative transcripts are thought to limit the expression of R proteins or encode truncated R proteins with a positive role in defense activation. In addition, R gene alternative splicing is dynamic during the defense response. Possible mechanisms of R gene alternative splicing regulation and how alternative R gene transcripts fit into the current view of resistance protein-mediated defense responses are discussed.

Keywords

Alternative Splice Alternative Transcript Intron Retention Gene Alternative Splice Nucleotide Binding Site Domain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Gassmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Plant Sciences and C.S. Bond Life Sciences CenterUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA

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