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uPackage – A Package to Enable Do-It-Yourself Style Ubiquitous Services with Daily Objects

  • Takuro Yonezawa
  • Hiroshi Sakakibara
  • Kengo Koizumi
  • Shingo Miyajima
  • Jin Nakazawa
  • Kazunori Takashio
  • Hideyuki Tokuda
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4836)

Abstract

This paper explores a suitable service model for realizing domestic smart object applications and proposes a software and hardware package called uPackage to support this model. By attaching a tiny wireless sensor node to users’ belongings, users can augment the object digitally and take the object into various services such as status monitoring or preventing lost property. The system provided by uPackage supports users to install and manage such smart object services; it enables users to digitally associate sensor nodes with daily objects, manage the associated information and sensor data, and create various smart object applications without professional skills. Initial demonstration to children indicate that the service model provided by uPackage is easy understandable and increases users’ acceptance of the wireless sensor node technology.

Keywords

Sensor Node Sensor Data Service Model Ubiquitous Computing Smart Object 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takuro Yonezawa
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Sakakibara
    • 1
  • Kengo Koizumi
    • 1
  • Shingo Miyajima
    • 1
  • Jin Nakazawa
    • 1
  • Kazunori Takashio
    • 2
  • Hideyuki Tokuda
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University 
  2. 2.Faculty of Environment and Information Studies, Keio University, 5322, Endo, Fujisawa, Kanagawa 252-8520Japan

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