Advertisement

Analog Circuit Evolution Based on FPTA-2

  • Qiongqin Wu
  • Yu Shi
  • Juan Zheng
  • Rui Yao
  • Youren Wang
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4684)

Abstract

FPTA-2 with feedback structure is evolved to achieve an effective amplifier. Results in both time and frequency domain show it’s more effectively than using open-loop circuit. A new kind of fitness function based on square error threshold is put forward. Special points of sine wave can evolve better by using such evaluation function. A new structure of multi-cell circuits is designed and experiments show such new structure can make evolution easier.

Keywords

Fitness Function Sine Wave Analog Circuit Error Threshold Feedback Circuit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Design of a 96 decibel operational amplifier and other problems for which a computer program evolved by genetic programming is competitive with human performances. In: 1996 Japan-China Joint Int. Workshop Information Systems, Ashikaga Inst. Technol., Ashikaga, Japan (1996)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Zebulum, R.S., Pacheco, M.A., Vellasco, M.: Synthesis of CMOS Operational Amplifiers through Genetic Algorithms. In: Proc. XI Brazilian Symp. Integrated Circuit Design, pp. 125–128 (1998)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Zhiqiang, Z., Youren, W.: A new Analog Circuit Design Based on Reconfigurable Transistor Array. In: 2006 8th International Conference on Solid-State and Integrated Circuit Technology Proceedings, Shanghai, China, pp. 1745–1747 (2006)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Yuehua, Z., Yu, S.: Analog Evolvable hardware Experiments based on FPTA. Users of Instruments 14(3), 10–12 (2006)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kaiyang, Z., Youren, W.: Research on evolvable circuits based on reconfigurable analog array. Computer testing and control 13(10) (2005)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Stoica, A., Zebulum, R., Keymeulen, D., Tawel, R., Daud, T., Thakoor, A.: Reconfigurable VLSI Architectures for Evolvable Hardware: from Experimental Field Programmable Transistor Arrays to Evolution-Oriented Chips. IEEE Transactions on VLSI Systems, Special Issue on Reconfigurable and Adaptive VLSI Systems 9(1), 227–232 (2001)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Levi: HereBoy: A Fast Evolutionary Algorithm [A]. In: Proceedings of the Second NASA/DoD Workshop on Evolvable Hardware[C]. Washington, pp. 17–24 (2000) Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Vieira, P.F., Sá, L.B., Botelho, J.P.B., Mesquita, A.: Evolutionary Synthesis of Analog Circuits Using Only MOS Transistors. In: EH 2004. Proceedings of the 2004 NASA/DoD Conference on Evolution Hardware (2004)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Langeheine, J., Trefzer, M., Brüderle, D., Meier, K., Schemmel, J.: On the Evolution of Analog Electronic Circuits Using Building Blocks on a CMOS FPTA. In: Deb, K., et al. (eds.) GECCO 2004. LNCS, vol. 3102, pp. 1316–1327. Springer, Heidelberg (2004)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qiongqin Wu
    • 1
  • Yu Shi
    • 1
  • Juan Zheng
    • 1
  • Rui Yao
    • 1
  • Youren Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Automation, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Jiangsu 210016China

Personalised recommendations