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The Stockholm Archipelago

  • C. Hill
  • K. Wallström
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 197)

The Stockholm archipelago is a brackish-water archipelago that extends along the Swedish east coast, just south of the border between the Bothnian Sea and the northern Baltic Proper. The Stockholm archipelago stretches about 200 km from Singö in the north to Nynäshamn in the south (Fig. 14.1). A nearly continuous belt of islands stretches eastwards from the Stockholm archipelago across to the Åland islands and the Åbo archipelago in Finland.

Keywords

Blue Mussel Harbour Porpoise Grey Seal Stockholm County Mute Swan 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Hill
    • 1
  • K. Wallström
    • 2
  1. 1.County Administrative Board of StockholmStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Department of Mathematics, Natural and Computer SciencesUniversity of GävleGävleSweden

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