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Introduction

  • U. Schiewer
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 197)

The Baltic Sea (Fig. 1.1) stretches from the Gulf of Finland to the Kattegat over 1,200 km in the east—west direction and from Odra Bay to Bothnian Bay near the polar circle over 1,300 km in the north—south direction. It covers an area of 415,266 km2 and has a water volume of approximately 21,000 km3. Traditionally, it has been divided into five main regions (Table 1.1).

Keywords

Particulate Organic Carbon Gotland Basin Permanent Halocline Landsort Deep Baltic Marine Environment Protection Commission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • U. Schiewer

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