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GL-SETI (gravitational lensing SETI): Receiving far ETI signals focused by the gravity of other stars

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

The SETI League (website: http://www.setileague.org) is a worldwide organization of thousands of SETI supporters who generally use small TV dishes and PCs to do SETI searches from their own backyards. In general, such modest apparatuses could hardly be expected to lead to a contact with ETI, except for ETIs living on planets of nearby stars, but the notion of gravitational lensing changes this picture completely. In fact, it could well happen that a very precise alignment occurred casually between the ETI source, an intermediate star acting as a focusing device, and the Earth. Thus, a transient but sufficiently strong ETI signal could be detected on Earth even if it comes from a very far source in the Galaxy and even if it is detected with a small dish apparatus. It all depends on the mass of the intervening star, on the precision of the alignment, and of course on the power of the ETI emitted radio waves.

Keywords

Radio Wave Aerospace Technology SETI Supporter SETI Search Nearby Star 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    R. Factor (WA2IKL), “A Third, Complementary, Microwave Search Strategy for SETI”, a paper presented at SETICon’ 01, the First SETI League Technical Symposium, held at the College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ, April 28–29, 2001, in particular see pp. 13–19.Google Scholar
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    C. Maccone, “SETI through the Gravitational Lenses of Alpha Centauri A, B, C and of Barnard’s Star”, a paper presented at SETICon’ 02, the Second SETI League Technical Symposium, held at the College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ, April 26–28, 2002, in particular see pp. 93–97.Google Scholar
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    John D. Kraus, Radio Astronomy, Second Edition, Cygnus—Quasar Books, 1986, in particular see pp. 12–2 through 12–4.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Praxis Publishing Ltd, Chichester, UK 2009

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